Spouses Program

Spouses or companions of participants will have program of sight-seeing in India on the following dates. Entry fees for monuments have to be paid by spouses or companions. Transportation cost for sight-seeing in each city will be US$ 50 or INR 3250 per person per day. The sight-seeing tour starts at 9.30 am and ends at 5.00 pm on each day.

MUMBAI (BOMBAY), INDIA: JULY 17
Gateway of India:

The Gateway of India was built in 1924 to commemorate the visit of King George V and Queen Mary to India. Built in the 16th century Gujarati style, the monument stood testament to British supremacy. Ironically, it was from here that the last British troops left the country after independence.

Haji Ali Mosque:
The Gateway of India was built in 1924 to commemorate the visit of King George V and Queen Mary to India. Built in the 16th century Gujarati style, the monument stood testament to British supremacy. Ironically, it was from here that the last British troops left the country after independence.

Hanging Gardens:
The Hanging Gardens or Ferozshah Mehta Gardens were laid in 1881 on top of a reservoir on Malabar Hill. The garden provides a spectacular view of the city.

High Court:
This building, designed in the English Gothic Style, was built in 1878. The main structure rises 54.2 m in height and is surmounted by statues representing Justice and Mercy.

Hutatma Chowk:

Better known as Flora Fountain after the beautiful stone fountain at its centre, Hutatma Chowk is the established business centre of Mumbai. The Fountain was erected in 1869 in honour of Sir Bartle Frere, Governor of Bombay, who was responsible for shaping much of Bombay

Jain Temple:
The Jain Temple, built in white marble, is dedicated to Adinath, the first apostle of the Jains. The temple is decorated with paintings depicting incidents from the life of the Tirthankaras. The first floor of the temple is particularly dedicated to Parasnath. His image has been carved out in black marble and images of planets as seen in Hindu mythology, adorn the ceiling.

Mani Bhavan (Gandhi Memorial): Mahatma Gandhi's residence in Bombay between 1917-34 has been converted into a museum, which displays pictures and books related to his life.

Marine Drive: Also known as Netaji Subhas Chandra Marg, Marine Drive features a bustling waterfront promenade. Marine Drive is built on land reclaimed along the Arabian coast, and runs from Nariman point to the foot of Malabar Hill. Sunsets here are particularly beautiful.

National Gallery of Modern Art:
The National Gallery of Modern art in Mumbai exhibits the work of prominent contemporary Indian artists. The National Gallery is housed in the building that was formerly Sir Cowasji Jehangir Public Hall.

Prince of Wales Museum:
Like the Gateway of India, this structure commemorates the visit of King George V. The building is built in Indo Sarcenic style and is surrounded by beautiful gardens. The central hall features a huge dome which is believed to have been inspired by the Golgumbaz. The museum, which opened in 1923, has an impressive collection of artifacts from places such as Elephanta Island, Jogeshwari Caves, and the Indus valley. There is a large collection of terracotta figurines, ivory carvings, statues, and miniatures.

HYDERABAD, INDIA: JULY 19 & 20

Charminar:
The Charminar is as much the signature of Hyderabad as the Taj Mahal is of Agra or the Eiffel Tower is of Paris. Mohammed Quli Qutb Shah, the founder of Hyderabad, built Charminar in 1591 at the centre of the original city layout. It is said to be built as a charm to ward off a deadly epidemic raging at that time. Four graceful minarets soar to a height of 48.7 m above the ground. Charminar has 45 prayer spaces and a mosque in it. Visitors can view the architectural splendour inside the Charminar. The monument is illuminated in the evenings and a pedestrianisation project around the monument is under implementation.

Mecca Masjid:
A two hundred yards southwest of the Charminar is the Mecca Masjid, so named because the bricks were brought from Mecca to build the central arch. The Qutb Shahis never finished the building of the mosque, which was completed by Aurangzeb in 1694.

Laad Baazar:
This is famous, colourful shopping centre of the old city, tucked away in one of the streets leading off from Charminar. Bridal wear, Pearls and the traditional Hyderabadi glass and stone studded bangles are sold here.

Golconda Fort:
Golconda is one of the famous forts of India. The name originates from the Telugu words “Golla Konda” meaning “Shepherd’s Hill”. The origins of the fort can be traced back to the Yadava dynasty of Deogiri and the Kakatiyas of Warangal. Golconda was originally a mud fort, which passed to the Bahmani dynasty and later to the Qutb Shahis, who held it from 1518 to 1687 A.D. The first three Qutb Shahi kings rebuilt Golconda, over a span of 62 years. The fort is famous for its acoustics, palaces, ingenious water supply system and the famous Fateh Rahben gun, one of the cannons used in the last siege of Golconda by Aurangzeb, to whom the fort ultimately fell.

Sound & Light Show at Golconda Fort:
This is famous, colourful shopping centre of the old city, tucked away in one of the streets leading off from Charminar. Bridal wear, Pearls and the traditional Hyderabadi glass and stone studded bangles are sold here.

Qutb Shahi Tombs:
The tombs of the legendary Qutb Shahi kings lie about a kilometre away from Banjara Darwaza of the Golconda Fort. Planned and built by the Qutb Shahis themselves, these tombs are said to be the oldest historical monuments in Hyderabad. They form a large group and stand on a raised platform. The tombs are built in Persian, Pathan and Hindu architectural styles using grey granite, with stucco ornamentation, the only one of its kind in the world where an entire dynasty has been buried at one place.

Taramati Baradari:
The tombs of the legendary Qutb Shahi kings lie about a kilometre away from Banjara Darwaza of the Golconda Fort. Planned and built by the Qutb Shahis themselves, these tombs are said to be the oldest historical monuments in Hyderabad. They form a large group and stand on a raised platform. The tombs are built in Persian, Pathan and Hindu architectural styles using grey granite, with stucco ornamentation, the only one of its kind in the world where an entire dynasty has been buried at one place.

Birla Mandir (Venkateswara Temple):
This white marble temple of Lord Venkateshwara floats on the city skyline, on Kala Pahad. The idol in the temple is a replica of the one at Tirumala Tirupati.

Birla Planetarium:
Birla Planetarium is India’s most modern planetarium and first of its kind in the country. It is equipped with advanced technology from Japan and is built on Naubat Pahad adjacent to Kala Pahad. And the Science Museum stands tribute to the advancement achieved by Science and Technology.

Salar Jung Museum (Friday Closed):
This museum houses one of the biggest one-man collections of antiques of the world by Mir Yousuf Ali Khan, Salar Jung III. The objects d’art include Persian carpets, Moghal miniatures, Chinese porcelain, Japanese lacquerware, famous statues including the Veiled Rebecca and Marguerite and Mephistopheles, a superb collection of jade, daggers belonging to Queen Noor Jahan and the Emperors Jahangir and Shah Jahan, Aurangzeb’s sword and many other fabulous items.

AP State Archaeological Museum:
A visit to the Andhra Pradesh State Archaeological Museum is a delight for art lovers. Located in the picturesque Public Gardens, the museum boasts of one of the richest repositories of antiques and art objects in the country. Built in 1920 by the Nizam VII, the museum building itself is a fine example of Indo-Saracenic architecture. The museum contains a Buddhist gallery, Brahmanical & Jain gallery, Bronze gallery, Arms & Armour gallery, Numismatics gallery, Ajanta gallery and more. Adjacent to the State Museum is the Contemporary Art Museum.

Public Gardens:
Hyderabad has several beautiful gardens, one of the most popular being the Public Gardens, which also encloses the State Legislature, State Archaeological Museum, Jubilee Hall, Jawahar Bal Bhavan and Telugu Lalita Kala Thoranam, an open-air theatre.

Nehru Zoological Park
Spanning 300 lush green acres, the Nehru Zoological Park is a must for nature lovers. It has over 250 species of animals and birds, most of which are kept in conditions as close to their natural habitats as possible. This is the first zoo to create moated enclosures for animals. The Lion Safari Park, Natural History Museum and Children’s Train are the added attractions.

Shilparamam (The Arts & Crafts Village):
Another attraction at Madhapur besides Hi-tec city in Hyderabad is the 30-acre village, which showcases arts and crafts of the country. India is an ocean of various arts and crafts but the talent of most of the artisans and artists goes unrecognized. To encourage them and give the necessary boost to their art, the crafts village hosts annual bazaars, where artists and artisans from all over the country exhibit their talent.

The Nizam‘S Silver Jubilee Museum:
The stately Purani Haveli, the palace acquired around the year 1750 by the second Nizam, is now converted into a museum with a fascinating collection. The museum exhibits the gifts and mementos presented to the last Nizam on the occasion of the silver jubilee celebrations in 1937. A 1930 Rolls Royce, Packard and a Mark V Jaguar are among the vintage cars displayed. There is an interesting collection of models made in silver of all the prominent buildings of the city and citations in Urdu about H.E.H. Mir Osman Ali Khan, gold burnished wooden throne used for the silver jubilee celebrations, gold tiffin box inlaid with diamonds, and a gold model of Jubilee Pavilion.

Chow Mohalla Palace
Built in several phases by the Nizams between 1857-1869, this is now one of the heritage buildings. The complex comprises four palaces in Moghal and European styles, of which the main palace is double storeyed with the others being single-storeyed blocks.

CHENNAI, INDIA: JULY 22

Mylapore:
Chennai's historic neighborhood of Mylapore is often referred to as the soul of the city. One of the oldest residential parts of the city, predominantly inhabited by Brahmins, it's full of culture. There you'll find Chennai's most impressive temple, the 17th century Kapaleeshwarar Temple dedicated to Lord Shiva. Other top attractions include the neo-Gothic style San Thome Cathedral, original built by the Portuguese, and the serene Ramakrishna Mutt Temple. Tamil poet and saint Thiruvalluvar, one of the icons of Tamil literature, is believed to have been born in Mylapore way back in the 1st century BC.

Fort Saint George:
A legacy of the British East India Company, which completed constructing it in 1653, Fort Saint George is now home to the Tamil Nadu Legislative Assembly and Secretariat. It also contains the grand Saint Mary's Church, which is one of the oldest surviving churches built by the British, and the Fort Museum. The museum displays a range of military memorabilia, relics, paintings, and artifacts from the colonial period. The entrance fee is 5 rupees for Indians and 100 rupees for foreigners.

Madras High Court:
Located just outside Fort Saint George, in George Town, the massive Madras High Court is one of the largest judicial buildings in the world. Built in 1892, it has distinctive red Indo-Saracenic architecture, with magnificent painted ceilings and stained-glass doors. It's possible to wander through the court and even sit in on a session.

Markets and Bazaars:
The congested lanes of George Town are occupied by some fascinating street stalls and markets, including vibrant vegetable, flower, and spice markets. This area, which used to be known as Black Town during the colonial period, was settled by locals who came to serve and trade with the Britishers in Fort Saint George. It was the first settlement of the city of Madras, which began its expansion from there in the 1640s. It's noisy, chaotic, and a photographer's delight!

Marina Beach:
For a real Indian beach experience, head to Marina beach at sunset and soak up the carnival-like atmosphere, with amusement rides and snack stalls. The beach, which is the longest urban beach in India, starts from near Fort Saint George and runs south for 13 kilometers (8.1 miles). It's dotted with numerous statues and monuments, and is a popular hangout place for locals. Tens of thousands of people visit it daily. The lighthouse, at the southern end of the beach, was opened for tourists in late 2013. Do note that bathing and swimming aren't permitted as there are strong currents.

Cholamandal Artists’ Village:
India's largest artists' commune, Cholamandal Artists’ Village, was set up in 1966 in Injambakkam village on the southern outskirts of Chennai. What's really remarkable about it is that the artists are self-sustaining and have not received any financial assistance -- they purchased their own land, and built everything themselves including their houses, studios, gallery, theater, and workshops. The village is renowned for having pioneered the Madras Movement of Art, which brought modern art to south India. You'll get to see an extraordinary collection of paintings and sculptures there, along with the artists at work.

Kalakshetra Arts Academy:
Kalakshetra is a cultural academy dedicated to the preservation and teaching of Indian art forms, with a focus on bharatanatyam, carnatic vocal and instrumental music, the visual arts, traditional crafts and textile design, history and philosophy. Built on 100 acres of land near the sea in southern Chennai, it's a wonderful place to visit if you're interested in the arts and culture of south India. There's a craft center and museum on the premises, and a heritage walk is also offered to groups (1,500 rupees per person). The entrance fee is 100 rupees for Indian residents and 500 rupees for foreigners. It's worth catching one of the free evening performances held at the auditorium on show days.

Vivekanandar House (Vivekanandar Illam):
Dedicated to Swami Vivekananda, Vivekananda House is maintained by Sri Ramakrishna Math and houses a permanent exhibition on his life and Indian culture. There's a meditation room on the second floor where the Swami stayed after his return from the west in February 1897. The distinctive Victorian-style building is more than 150 years old and was originally built to store ice. It was subsequently purchased by Biligiri Iyengar, an advocate of the Madras High Court, who named it Castle Kernan. Vivekananda House is located opposite Marina Beach in Triplicane. It's open from 10.00 a.m. until 12.15 p.m. and 3.00 p.m. until 7.15 p.m, daily except Wednesday.

The Turtle Walk:
Did you know that the coast of Chennai is a breeding ground for the endangered Olive Ridley turtle? During nesting season, from December to April each year, large numbers of turtles come ashore to lay their eggs. The hatchlings are left to make their own way into the sea and many of them die. In order to increase their chances of survival, volunteers of the Students Sea Turtle Conservation Network (SSTCN) conduct walks to collect their eggs and take them to a hatchery. The walks happen on Friday and Saturday nights, starting at 11 p.m, from Neelangarai beach to Besant Nagar beach. Members of the public are welcome to join in.

BANGALORE (BENGALURU), INDIA: JULY 24

Vidhana Soudha:
The State Legislative and Secretariat House was built in 1956 in the Neo Dravidian Style with granite entirely sourced from the city itself. This imposing structure represents the best of Bangalore's monuments. Do not miss the sight of the illuminated building on Sundays between 7 and 8 PM.

Venkatappa Art Gallery:
One of the country's oldest art museums, this gallery houses many interesting antiques and archaeological objects. (Closed on Wednesday).

Visvesvaraya Industrial and Technological Museum:
Named after the famous Sir M. Visveswaraya , an engineer par excellence who built many famous dams in Karnataka, this Science museum houses models of machines. It is a highly recommended spot for children.(Closed on Monday).

Bangalore Palace:
The Bangalore Palace was built in the year 1887 by the Wodeyar dynasty. It is built similar to medieval castles in Normandy and England . It's interiors boasts of elegant woodcarvings and Tudor -style architecture.

Tipu's Palace:
The Palace was constructed first by Hyder Ali and completed by his son Tipu Sultan in the year 1791. Tipu called it as 'The Envy of Heaven'. It is constructed mainly in wood and has fine intricately sculpted arches surrounded by exquisite minarets.

ISKCON Temple:
The ISKCON provides much more for the soul, than those rituals. ISKCON are centers of spiritual learning through Godly association, where a visitor is inspired to learn more about Spiritual life. There is a magnificent main temple hall, which houses the altars of Their Lordships Sri Radha Krishna-Chandra, Sri Krishna Balarama & Sri Nitai Gouranga. Also one can see the Golden Chandelier that is shaped like an inverted Lotus Flower.

Bull Temple:
At Basavangudi is one of Bangalore's oldest temples. Built for Nandi, the sacred Bull, the vehicle of Lord Shiva, this temple has a 4.6 meter tall-carved statue of the sacred bull.

Whitefield:
The Shri Satya Sai Baba ashram is the chief attraction at Whitefield. It is now more or less a suburb of Bangalore, with increased access lines and more people moving into the neighborhood. The ashram is called Brindavan and any public transportation will take you there, though auto rickshaws may make a bit of noise about the extra charge you ought to pay. It is an interesting place, and the sage has quite a few interesting aspects to his personalities. He is very revered and many people believe him to be an incarnation of the earlier Sai Baba of Shirdi, a Hindu saint of older days.

Government Museum/Art Gallery:
This museum is located near Kasturba Gandhi Road and is one of the oldest museums of the country, established in the year 1866. The building is a Neo-classical structure built with Corinthian columns. It has 18 sections which include a collection of jewelry, miniature paintings, sculptures and artifacts. It is a pleasant treat for art lovers. The Venkatappa Art Gallery is a wing of this museum which has paintings related to the Mysore style. The gallery has about 600 paintings, which are on display throughout the year. On the ground floor, the paintings of K. Venkatappa, born in 1887 to a family of court painters, are on display.

Lal Bagh Botanical Gardens:
The rich and beautiful Lal Bagh Garden is a pleasant 240 acre park in the southern suburbs of Bangalore. One of the many gardens in the city, Lal Bagh is the most famous garden of Bangalore. The Lal Bagh rock is one of the oldest rock formations in India and is believed to be 3000 million years old. The pleasant and superb gardens were laid out by Hyderali in 1760 and his son Tipu Sultan added a wealth of plants and trees from many countries. It was originally called Lalbagh because the garden had a profusion of red roses. It has a very good collection of tropical & sub tropical and medicinal plants.

Nrityagram:
Nrityagram is situated at about 30 km from Bangalore. It is a unique cultural village that offers aspiring dancers a chance to study and train in all disciplines of traditional Indian Dances, Choreography, mythology, music, philosophy and painting. It hosts the annual musical fest 'Vasant Habba' where artists from all over India showcase their talents in an all-night programme. The programme also includes an explanation about the background of the history of a 60 minute training session of Guru-Shishya (teacher and pupil) relation, followed by a pure vegetarian lunch with teachers and students, served in a traditional manner.

KOLKATA (CALCUTTA), INDIA: JULY 26

Howrah Bridge:
The construction of the sixth longest cantilever bridge in the world, the Howrah Bridge is one of the most famous landmarks of Kolkata. The bridge was originally called the New Howrah Bridge as it was meant to replace an older pontoon bridge on the Hoogly River. The bridge is often considered to be one of the major National Landmarks in India and is also called the Rabindra Setu after the famous Bengali literary figure Rabindranath Tagore.

Jorasanko Thakurbari:
Jorasanko Thakurbari or the House of the Thakurs is the ancestral residence of the Tagore family. The mansion was built during the 18th century by Prince Dwarkanath Tagore the grandfather of Rabindranath Tagore. The place now houses the Rabindra Bharathi University and a museum that contains the various articles and articles that depict and describe the life and times of the Tagores.

Park Street:
Park Street is also called Food Street and the Street that never sleeps by the locals due to the various restaurants and pubs located in the area. The place was one of the top night life spots during the 70’s and the 80’s. The street is one of the major attractions in Kolkata and is visited by a huge number of tourist and local crowds.

Indian Museum:
The Indian Museum in Kolkata is the largest and the oldest museums in India and was established in 1814. The museum contains 6 sections which are further split in 35 galleries and contain a plethora of various antiquities, artifacts, paintings and mummies etc. The museum was established by a Dutch botanist under the British, Dr. Nathaniel Wallich and is one of the oldest museums in the world.

Victoria Memorial:
Victoria Memorial is located on the plains at the banks of the River Hoogly and was completed in 1921. It is dedicated in the memory of Queen Victoria and is currently a museum. After the death of Queen Victoria in 1901, Lord Curzon commissioned the construction of this memorial and is built in a unique architectural blend of Mughal and British styles. The museum contains 25 galleries that house various antiquities and artifacts.

St. Paul's Cathedral:
St. Paul's Cathedral is an Anglican cathedral in Kolkata, West Bengal, India, noted for its Gothic architecture. It is the seat of the Diocese of Calcutta. The cornerstone was laid in 1839; the building was completed in 1847.[1] It is said to be the largest cathedral in Kolkata and the first Episcopal Church in Asia. It was also the first cathedral built in the overseas territory of the British Empire. The edifice stands on Cathedral Road on the "island of attractions" to provide for more space for the growing population of the European community in Calcutta in the 1800s.

Birla Temple:
The construction of the temple began in 1970 and took 26 years to complete. Birla Temple is one of the several Birla temple landmarks that are located in various major cities across India. The temple was commissioned by the Industrial Birla Family of India and is dedicated to Lord Krishna and his consort Radha. The temple is built in carved white marble and is spread across an approximate area of 130 acres of land.

Calcutta Racecourse:
The Royal Calcutta turf club was founded in 1847 in the British India and was the 1st horse racing organization in India. The Calcutta or the Kolkata Racecourse was established in 1820 and is one of the oldest horse race courses in the country. The races are operated between the months of July to September and November to March on Saturdays or any other public holidays.

Eden Garden:
The arrival of the British in India, gave the country its most favorite sport Cricket. Eden Gardens are a massive capacity cricket ground and is often called a Cricket Colosseum. The Eden Gardens are the largest capacity cricket ground in the country and the 3rd largest in the world. The Stadium is one of the most iconic cricket grounds in India and is home to the Kolkata Knight Riders cricket club in the Indian Premier League.

Marble Palace Mansion:
The palatial mansion was built in 1835 by Raja Rajendra Mullick and is a residence for his descendants till date. The architecture of the Marble Palace Mansion is neoclassical and is considered the best preserved sites of this style of architecture. The palace also houses a museum which contains various antique furniture and old paintings. The nearby zoo called the Marble Palace zoo is also a must visit.

NEW DELHI (DELHI), INDIA: JULY 28

Old Fort or Purana Quila:
The fort is said to be constructed on the historic site of Indraprastha (900BC) by Humayun and Sher Shah. Covering a circuit of about a mile, the walls of the fort have three gates and are surrounded by a moat fed by the river Yamuna. The wall was built by Humayun while the buildings in the fort are attributed to Sher Shah. The notable buildings that have survived in the fort are the Sher Mandal and the Quila-I-kholina Mosque.

Qutub Minar:
The origins of Qutab Minar are shrouded in controversy. Some believe it was erected as a tower of victory to signify the beginning of the Muslim rule in India. Others say it served as a minaret to the muezzins to call the faithful to prayer. No one can, however, dispute that the tower is not only one of the finest monuments in India, but also in the world. Qutab-ud-din Aibak, the first Muslim ruler of Delhi, commenced the construction of the Qutab Minar in 1200 AD, but could only finish the basement. His successor, Iltutmush, added three more storeys, and in 1368, Firoz Shah Tughlak constructed the fifth and the last storey.

Humayun's Tomb:
The Mughals brought with them a love for gardens, fountains and water. The first mature example of Mughal architecture in India, Humayun's Tomb was built by the emperor's grieving widow, Haji Begum, in 1565 AD. Constructed with red sandstone and ornamented marks the beginning of a new tradition of ornate style, which culminated in the Taj Mahal of Agra. Designed by the Persian architect, Mirza Ghyas, Humayun's Tomb shows a marked shift from the Persian tradition of using coloured tiles for ornamentation. Located in the midst of a large square garden, screened by high walls, with gateways to the south and west, the tomb is a square tower surmounted by a magnificent marble dome. The dome stands 140 feet from the base of the terrace and is topped with a copper pinnacle. In addition to the remains of Humayun, the complex also houses the grave of many other distinguished members of the Mughal dynasty.

Jama Masjid:
Work on the Jama Masjid mosque was begun in 1650 by the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan to complement his palace at the Red Fort. More than 5,000 workers toiled for six years to complete the largest mosque in India. Every Friday, the emperor and his retinue would travel in state from the fort to the mosque to attend the congressional prayers. A fine example of Mughal architecture, the Jama Masjid has three gateways.

Jantar Mantar:
At first sight, the Jantar Mantar appears like a gallery of modern art. It is, however, an observatory. Sawai Jai Singh II of Jaipur (1699-1743), a keen astronomer and a noble in the Mughal court, was dissatisfied by the errors of brass and metal astronomical instruments. Under patronage from the emperor, he set on himself the task of correcting the existing astronomical tables and updating the almanac with more reliable instruments. Delhi's Jantar Mantar is the first of the five observatories that he built with large masonry instruments. The observatory has the Samrat Yantra, a simple equal hour sun dial, the Ram yantra for reading altitudinal angles; Jai Prakash for ascertaining the position of the sun and other celestial bodies, and the Misra Yantra which is a combination of four scientific gadgets.

Red Fort or Lal Quila (Son-et-lumiere show):
The mughal emperor, Shah Jahan, after ruling from Agra for elleven years, decided to shift to Delhi and laid the foundation stone of the Red Fort in 1618. It is called so because of the red stone with which it is built, the Red Fort is one of the most magnificent palaces in the world. India's history is also closely linked with this fort. It was from here that the British deposed the last Mughal ruler, Bahadur Shah Zafar, marking the end of the three century long Mughal rule. It was also from its ramparts that the first Prime Minister of India, pandit Jawharlal Nehru, announced to the nation that India was free form colonial rule.Daily sound and light shows are held here in Both Hindi & English.

India Gate:
Built as a memorial to commemorate the 70,000 India soldiers killed in World War I, India Gate was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens and completed in 1931. Located on Rajpath, the road that leads to the magnificent Rashtrapati Bhawan, the gate is 160 feet high with an arch of 138 feet. Built from sandstone, the arch also houses the Eternal Flame, a gesture in memory of the Indian soldiers who laid their lives in the 1971 war with Pakistan.

Rashtrapati Bhavan & Mughal Gardens:
Formely the Viceregal Lodge, the building is the highlight of Lutyen's New Delhi and was completed in 1929 at a cost of 12,53,000 pound sterling. Located in an area of 130 hectares, the palace has 340 rooms. At one time, 2,000 people were required to look after the building and serve the Viceroy's household. The lodge also has impressive garden called the Mughal Garden, which is open to public twice in a year, usually in February and March.

Dilli Haat:
Dilli Haat and Craft Bazaar ... experience the traditional weekly village market, complete with crafts, food and cultural activities.

Birla Mandir / Laxmi Narayan Temple:
Also known as the Lakshmi Narayan Temple, it is ideally located in central Delhi (Mandir Marg). This temple dedicated to the goddess of wealth, Lakshmi and Lord Narayana (Lord Vishnu) was built in 1938 by the prominent Indian industrialist Raja Baldev Das Birla and inaugurated by Mahatma Gandhi. The temple, built in Orissan style, has a large number of idols representing various gods of Indian pantheon. The well-grafted gardens need a special mention.

Bahai's temple / Lotus Temple:
The BAHAI HOUSE,called as lotus temple of worship is a marvel of modern architecture. It is made in the shape of a lotus.it is one of the major attractions for national and international tourists.it repesents the Bahai's faith which is an independent world religion, divine in origin, all-embracing in scope, broad in its outlook, scientific in its method, humanitarian in its principles and dynamic in the influence it exerts on the hearts and minds of men.

Akshardham Temple Complex:
A mega temple complex, one of the biggest and most intricate places of worship ever constructed, is drawing hordes of visitors and seems set to become a major tourist attraction. It is widely being heralded as one of the greatest monuments India has ever produced.

The National Museum on Janpath:
It is the premier repository of antiquities. Built in 1960, it has an extraordinary collection representing the entire span of Indian civilization from pre-historic times. Its galleries include finds from the Indus Valley Civilization, superb sculptures in stone, and bronzes from the Chola period, the largest collection of miniature paintings in the world, manuscripts, a Buddhist Gallery, including relics of the Buddha from Piprahwa, the exquisite Jewellery Gallery, the Anthropological Gallery of tribal art; galleries devoted to decorative and applied arts, Maritime Heritage and Pre-Columbian art, and the Central Asian Antiquities, Gallery of Auriel Stein's finds along the ancient Silk Route (the great murals however, are on display at the adjacent Archaeological Survey of India).

The Cottage industry Emporium (Closed on Sunday):
Right in the heart of Connaught place is the govt. run one place mall for every kind of art & craft products made in India. Right from jewellery, silk, sarees, furnishing, carpets, furniture to toys, trinkets, clothes, tea, silver, sandalwood, pottery and brass items.